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On October 2, 2020 (almost two months after the August 10, 2020 commencement of the acceptance period for forgiveness applications), the Small Business Administration (SBA) released an SBA Procedural Notice (the “Notice”) concerning required procedures for change of ownership of an entity that has received PPP loans (the “PPP Borrower”). Under the Notice, SBA approval

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On August 4, 2020, the Small Business Administration (SBA) released a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) addressing numerous technical issues on PPP Loan Forgiveness. On August 11, 2020, the FAQs were updated to include additional guidance for recipients of both PPP Loans and Economic Injury Disaster Loans.

The following are the major takeaways from the

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On July 28, 2020, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) Office of the Inspector General (OIG) issued a report titled, “Serious Concerns of Potential Fraud in the Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program Pertaining to the Response to COVID-19.” The report identifies and summarizes OIG’s “serious concerns” of potential fraud and calls for “immediate attention and

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Federal authorities continue to prioritize and aggressively pursue individuals across the country who seek to exploit coronavirus relief programs meant to aid small businesses and their employees. Over the past week, Muge Ma of New York and Samuel Yates of Texas were arrested, each for submitting multiple fraudulent applications for COVID-19 relief through the Paycheck

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Yesterday we reported on the publication of FAQ 46 by the Small Business Administration (SBA) regarding the economic necessity certification contained in the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) application and that the safe harbor deadline of May 14, 2020 remained in place. Late last night though, the SBA issued FAQ 47 in which it automatically extended

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On May 5, 2020—a mere two days before the close of the “safe harbor” period established by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for borrowers to return Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans if recipients did not believe they could make the economic need certification in good faith—Treasury and the SBA have updated their FAQ document with

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On April 30, 2020, the Small Business Administration (SBA) released an interim final rule imposing a $20 million cap on the aggregate amount of loans a single corporate group can receive from the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). Given the high demand for PPP loans and finite appropriations, the SBA has imposed this limit in order

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On April 23, 2020, Treasury drastically complicated the landscape for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) by updating a Frequently Asked Questions document with a response to the question: “Do businesses owned by large companies with adequate sources of liquidity to support the business’s ongoing operations qualify for a PPP loan?”

The PPP application requires applicants

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Over the past two days, SBA has released in the middle of the night two draft Interim Final Rules as well as a final application and additional guidance – including on affiliation – on the overhauled Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans, implementing Sections 1102 and 1106 of the CARES Act.  Since the passage of the

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With the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and funding for the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EDIL) unlocking a combined total of over $360 billion for loans to cover urgent business costs, including payroll costs, employee benefits and leave, mortgage interest payments, debt refinancing, rent and utilities, the CARES Act has extended an