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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued interim guidance for enforcing the recording of occupational illnesses requirements, specifically for cases of coronavirus (COVID-19). This guidance rescinds OSHA’s earlier guidance providing for enforcement discretion on COVID-19 complaints arising outside of healthcare or emergency response employers. As of May 26, 2020, and until further notice, OSHA

On April 27, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in Maine Cmty. Health Options et al v. United States, ruling in favor of Maine and companion insurers in the long running Affordable Care Act §1342 “risk corridors” litigation, and confirming the government’s obligation to pay insurers approximately $13 billion for their work related

On March 10, 2020, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued Guidance for employers to prevent occupational exposures to the coronavirus. In doing so, OSHA reminds employers that while no specific standard governs occupational exposure to the coronavirus, the Occupational Safety and Health Act’s General Duty Clause, 29 U.S.C. § 654 (a)(1), requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm.

The Guidance contains recommendations and describes safety and health standards that, if followed, could help employers reduce potential enforcement actions for employees who may be exposed to COVID-19 in the workplace. While recognizing it may not be possible to eliminate a COVID-19 outbreak hazard, the Guidance lists what OSHA believes to be effective protective measures (from most to least effective): engineering controls, administrative controls, safe work practices (a type of administrative control), and personal protective equipment (PPE).
Continue Reading OSHA Issues Guidance to Employers on Preventing Worker Exposure to Coronavirus (COVID-19)

In a recent decision, the Court of Federal Claims rejected the Government’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit filed under the Tucker Act seeking to recover “risk corridors” payments pursuant to §1342 of the Affordable Care Act. In Health Republic Insurance Co. v. U.S. (Jan. 10, 2017), the Court held that “HHS is required to make