Photo of Dj Wolff

David (Dj) Wolff is a partner and attorney at law in the firm's Washington, D.C. and London offices and a director with C&M International, the firm's trade policy affiliate.

At Crowell & Moring, he practices in the International Trade Group, where his practice covers compliance with U.S. economic sanctions, export controls and antiboycott regimes, and anti-money laundering (AML) laws and regulations. He is experienced in providing day-to-day compliance guidance, developing compliance programs including through on-site compliance trainings, responding to government inquiries, conducting internal investigations, representing them during civil and criminal enforcement proceedings, and, in collaboration with colleagues, managing the potential conflict of laws that can arise from the interaction between extraterritorial impacts of U.S. regulations and third country "blocking" laws or data privacy regulations. Dj splits his time between Washington and London, working regularly with European clients and colleagues to provide coordinated guidance on U.S., U.K., and EU sanctions compliance and enforcement. Dj also has extensive experience in international mergers and acquisitions, advising both buyers and sellers regarding the international trade implications of a potential deal.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), under the Department of Homeland Security, has released a Temporary Final Rule that invokes the Defense Production Act (DPA) to allocate certain Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for domestic use and prohibit exportation of PPE from the U.S. without express FEMA approval. The mechanics of implementation remain somewhat unclear, but

At 1:00 pm (Eastern) on January 30, 2013, Crowell & Moring attorneys Addie Cliffe, Dj Wolff, and J.J. Saulino will conduct a webinar on behalf of L2 Federal Resources entitled “Export Controls, Economic and Trade Sanctions: The Challenges and Risks.” This 90-minute webinar will provide an overview of the two primary sets of regulations governing

Here they go again. Undeterred by the failure of the EO Survey five years ago, on August 10, 2011, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (“OFCCP”) published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“ANPRM”) soliciting public feedback on development of a new compensation data collection tool.  According to the ANPRM, this data collection is