Photo of Mana Elihu LombardoPhoto of Amy Laderberg O'SullivanPhoto of Paul J. PollockPhoto of Jeffrey C. SelmanPhoto of Olivia Lynch

On May 5, 2020—a mere two days before the close of the “safe harbor” period established by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for borrowers to return Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans if recipients did not believe they could make the economic need certification in good faith—Treasury and the SBA have updated their FAQ document with

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Despite the coronavirus pandemic, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP or “the Agency”) remains busy, and there are several recent developments of which all contractors should be aware. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has finally approved the Agency’s new Scheduling Letters, and the OFCCP will soon begin using those for

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The General Services Administration (GSA) recently launched a website dedicated to Coronavirus Acquisition-Related Information and Resources. It’s our understanding that the website will be updated regularly and will create a helpful catalogue of public facing guidance, policies, frequently asked questions, and other information generated by federal government agencies on COVID-19-related procurement matters. In addition, the

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Virginia law enforcement agencies have created a new task force to address the increased threats of fraud associated with the COVID-19 outbreak. Specifically, the Virginia Coronavirus Fraud Task Force is a joint federal and state initiative that will be led by Assistant U.S. Attorney Kaitlin G. Cooke in the Eastern District of Virginia, Assistant U.S.

Photo of Alan W. H. GourleyPhoto of Adelicia R. CliffePhoto of Evan D. WolffPhoto of Paul FreemanPhoto of Michelle ColemanPhoto of Stephanie CrawfordPhoto of Michael G. Gruden, CIPP/G

The Coronavirus Pandemic continues to cause disruptions and highlight vulnerabilities in supply chains across nearly all industrial sectors.  As businesses attempt to respond to challenges in obtaining parts and supplies, meeting contract supply and staffing requirements, and adhering to CDC recommendations, companies should be aware of how to minimize disruptions, preserve their rights, and avoid

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With the coronavirus disrupting business in parts of Asia and with increasing impacts in the United States, government contractors should prepare for the potential issues that may result if the virus spreads across the United States and across other countries where U.S. government contracts are performed. In addition to being proactive and mindful of health