Photo of Rob SneckenbergPhoto of Cherie Owen

As Russia’s assault on Ukraine continues, countries around the world are taking action.  Relevant to U.S. Government contractors, on April 22, the Defense Logistics Agency (“DLA”) issued a Request for Information (“RFI”) seeking information on companies’ abilities to deliver military and commercial assistance to Ukraine.  The RFI states that “the Biden Administration is working around the clock to fulfill Ukraine’s priority security assistance requests,” and explains that “Russia’s unprovoked invasion has highlighted the importance of dialogue between industry and commercial partners and the Department of Defense.”  To that end, the RFI seeks to fulfill three strategic objectives:

  • Delivering critical commercial and military capabilities to Ukraine;
  • Enhancing the preparedness of our own forces; and
  • Supporting our allies and partners in bolstering their defense capabilities.

Of particular interest to DOD are options that would accelerate production and build more capacity across the industrial base for weapons and equipment that can be rapidly exported, deployed with minimal training, and that are proven effective in the battlefield.  Specifically, the RFI seeks information from industry on weapons systems or other commercial capabilities related to air defense, anti-armor, anti-personnel, coastal defense, counter battery, unmanned aerial systems, and communications (e.g., secure radios, satellite internet).  Among other things, the RFI asks respondents to “describe the weapon, product, or system you believe could assist the Ukrainian military” and state what delivery timeframe they could meet.

Responses are due by Noon Eastern on May 6, 2022, and should be submitted in accordance with the instructions outlined in the RFI.

As the war in Ukraine continues, Government contractors should be alert for this and similar opportunities to bolster the United States’ defenses and assist Ukraine.  The FY2022 omnibus appropriations bill – signed into law in March 15 – includes a $13.6 billion Ukraine aid package, $6.5 billion of which was earmarked for military support for Eastern European countries, including $3.5 billion in additional weapons for Ukraine.  In addition, on April 21, President Biden announced that the U.S. will provide another $800 million in assistance to Ukraine, which will include heavy artillery, ammunition, and tactical drones.

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Photo of Rob Sneckenberg Rob Sneckenberg

Rob Sneckenberg is a government contracts litigator in Crowell & Moring’s Washington, D.C. office. He routinely first chairs bid protests before the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) and U.S. Court of Federal Claims (COFC), and has successfully argued multiple appeals before the U.S.

Rob Sneckenberg is a government contracts litigator in Crowell & Moring’s Washington, D.C. office. He routinely first chairs bid protests before the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) and U.S. Court of Federal Claims (COFC), and has successfully argued multiple appeals before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. He also represents contractors in contract claim and cost accounting disputes before the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals (ASBCA), and counsels clients on a wide array of government contracts investigations. Rob is very active in Crowell & Moring’s pro bono program, where he focuses on civil and criminal appeals.

Photo of Cherie Owen Cherie Owen

Cherie Owen is a senior counsel in the Government Contracts group. Cherie counsels and represents clients in a wide array of government contracts issues, with a focus on bid protests at the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the United States Court…

Cherie Owen is a senior counsel in the Government Contracts group. Cherie counsels and represents clients in a wide array of government contracts issues, with a focus on bid protests at the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the United States Court of Federal Claims. As a former GAO bid protest hearing officer, she resolved some of the most challenging bid protests on procurements ranging from thousands to billions of dollars involving solicitation challenges, proposal evaluation challenges, organizational conflicts of interest, Procurement Integrity Act violations, affirmative responsibility determinations, the conduct of discussions, and competitive range determinations. In this role, Cherie held numerous bid protest hearings. At GAO she handled more than 600 protests and issued more than 500 decisions.