Photo of Adelicia R. CliffePhoto of Kate M. Growley, CIPP/G, CIPP/USPhoto of Michelle ColemanPhoto of Laura J. Mitchell Baker

On July 1, 2020, the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of Inspector General (OIG) published its audit report. The report assessed the DoD Joint Artificial Intelligence Center’s (JAIC) progress in developing an Artificial Intelligence (AI) governance framework and standards, as well as DoD components’ implementation of security controls to protect AI data and technologies

Photo of Kate M. Growley, CIPP/G, CIPP/USPhoto of Evan D. WolffPhoto of Michael G. Gruden, CIPP/GPhoto of Maida Oringher LernerPhoto of Christopher Hebdon

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently released the final public draft of NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-172, formerly known as Draft NIST SP 800-171B. Building on the security requirements in NIST SP 800-171, the applicable standard under DFARS 252.204-7012, 800-172 provides 34 enhanced requirements to protect Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI)

Photo of Mana Elihu LombardoPhoto of Stephanie MarcantonioPhoto of Amy Laderberg O'SullivanPhoto of Paul J. PollockPhoto of Olivia Lynch

On July 6, 2020, the Small Business Administration (SBA) has made publicly available various types of information about all Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, and targeted media scrutiny has immediately followed. For loans of $150,000 and above, the SBA has released the loan range (e.g., $150,000 – 350,000, $1,000,000 – 2,000,000, $5,000,000 – 10,000,000) and

Photo of Kate M. Growley, CIPP/G, CIPP/USPhoto of Evan D. WolffPhoto of Michael G. Gruden, CIPP/G

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently released the final public draft of NIST Special Publication (SP) 800-172, formerly known as Draft NIST SP 800-171B. Building on the security requirements in NIST SP 800-171, the applicable standard under DFARS 252.204-7012, 800-172 provides 34 enhanced requirements to protect Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI)

Photo of Amy Laderberg O'SullivanPhoto of Zachary Schroeder

In Computer World Services Corporation, GAO sustained a protest challenging the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard’s corrective action taken in response to an earlier sustained protest by CWS. In its original protest, CWS successfully challenged a task order award; in response, the agency informed offerors via e-mail that it intended to remove

Photo of Mana Elihu LombardoPhoto of Jacinta Alves

In this episode, hosts Mana Lombardo and Jacinta Alves discuss the $175 Billion CARES Act Provider Relief Fund established in response to the COVID-19 Pandemic and FCA risks associated with receipt of those funds. “Let’s Talk FCA” is Crowell & Moring’s podcast covering the latest developments with the False Claims Act.

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Photo of Jacinta AlvesPhoto of Lorraine M. CamposPhoto of Brian Tully McLaughlinPhoto of Gail D. ZirkelbachPhoto of Lyndsay GortonPhoto of Stephanie Crawford

On June 17, 2020, the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee (PRAC) issued its first report, “Top Challenges Facing Federal Agencies: COVID-19 Emergency Relief and Response Effort” (the “Report”). PRAC was established by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”). It consists of the twenty-one offices of inspectors general (OIGs) that oversee the

Photo of Adelicia R. CliffePhoto of Alan W. H. GourleyPhoto of M.Yuan ZhouPhoto of Stephanie Crawford

Section 889(a)(1)(B) of the FY 2019 NDAA, scheduled to become effective on August 13, 2020, bars the Government from entering into a contract, or extending or renewing a contract, with any entity that uses certain covered telecommunications equipment or services. The prohibition against “use” of covered equipment applies broadly to a contractor’s “use” anywhere within

Photo of Adelicia R. CliffePhoto of Alan W. H. GourleyPhoto of M.Yuan ZhouPhoto of Stephanie Crawford

Section 889(a)(1)(B) of the FY 2019 NDAA, scheduled to become effective on August 13, 2020, bars the Government from entering into a contract, or extending or renewing a contract, with any entity that uses certain covered telecommunications equipment or services. The prohibition against “use” of covered equipment applies broadly to a contractor’s “use” anywhere within