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Federal agencies (and their government contractors) are about to embark on a second generation of sustainability upgrades to federal government facilities, procurement and operations.  On March 19, 2015, President Obama released an executive order titled “Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade” (“EO”).  The EO establishes next generation greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and sustainability targets and mandates that agencies develop plans to deploy clean energy and resource efficiency measures to improve resilience and environmental performance throughout their supply chains.  The EO mandates the establishment of a new Chief Sustainability Officer for each agency charged with overseeing implementation and compliance with EO.  The 7 largest federal procuring agencies will also be required to submit a plan to implement at least five new procurements each year that will include requirements considering government contractor GHG profiles and management practices.

Climate Risk Management.  Within 90 days of the EO (approximately June 16th), the head of each federal agency must propose agency-wide, 2025 GHG emission reduction plans for scope 1 (direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources owned controlled by the agency), scope 2 (direct greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the generation of electricity, heat, or steam purchased by the agency) and scope 3 (greenhouse gas emissions from sources not owned by the agency but related to agency activities, including vendor supply chains).  The targets will not include emissions from certain vehicles and equipment, and electric energy generation produced and sold commercially to other parties as the primary business of the agency. Continue Reading Obama Administration Mandates New Federal Agency Sustainability Objectives

On October 17, 2014, the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) issued a solicitation for the construction and operation of large-scale solar and wind projects at the Fort Hood military base. Fort Hood is the largest active military duty post in the U.S., located approximately 60 miles north of Austin, Texas.

The RFP, which is the latest renewable energy project under the landmark $7 billion Multiple-Award Task Order Contract overseen by the U.S. Army Office of Energy Initiatives (previously discussed here), seeks one or more energy development firms to build, own and operate renewable energy capacity capable of servicing 100% of Fort Hood electrical energy requirements – where peak energy demand is approximately 110 MW. The RFP contemplates a fixed price contract for up to 29 years with minimum annual production of 30 GWh from on-site solar resources and 200 GWh from off-site wind resources, with excess generation from off-site resources available for contractor use (subject to the government’s first right of refusal to purchase). All necessary facilities will be constructed, owned, operated, and maintained by the contractor for the duration of the contract, and the government will retain a purchase option at its expiration or early termination. The scale of the project demonstrates the Federal Government’s continued emphasis on expanded onsite use and development of renewable energy resources (discussed here, here, and here).

For a list of additional projects and opportunities under the MATOC, follow the link.